Human Genes are Not Patentable! Implications of Supreme Court Decision in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Thursday, June 27 2013
3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Location: Boston Marriott Cambridge, Two Cambridge Center, 50 Broadway Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142

The Pepper Hamilton Life Sciences Speaker Series focuses on legal issues for life sciences, health care, medical device and pharmaceutical companies. Please join us for the next session of our Boston series:

Human Genes are Not Patentable!
Implications of Supreme Court Decision in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Please join us for the next session of our Boston series, which will focus on the Supreme Court ruling in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.

The United States Supreme Court has handed down its decision in the case of Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.   The court was asked to decide if genes are "products of nature", which are naturally occurring and may not be patented, or "human-made inventions" eligible for patent protection.  The Supreme Court unanimously ruled that human genes cannot be patented, a decision that has a significant impact on biotechnology research. However, the justices did indicate that a company may patent a type of DNA that goes beyond extracting the genes from the body.

The Myriad decision together with the previous decision of the Supreme Court directed to patenting diagnostic methods (Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Laboratories, Inc.), will define the contour of protection that can be obtained for many cutting edge biotechnology inventions, including new discoveries in the use of genetic information to diagnose diseases and to tailor treatment options for individual patients.

In this session Pepper partners, Gregory Williams, Thomas Engellenner and Reza Mollaaghababa will: 

  • provide an overview of statutory and case law basis of patent eligible subject matter
  • discuss the ruling of the Myriad case and its implications
  • review recent court rulings in patenting diagnostic methods
  • discuss tips for protecting biotechnology inventions in view of recent case law.

                                           There is no fee to attend this seminar.

To register, visit http://www.regonline.com/Boston62713.

For more information please contact Kim MacAlister at macalisterk@pepperlaw.com or 215.981.4249.

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