MassBio Annual Meeting & Vendor Expo

Tuesday, March 30 – Wednesday, March 31 2010

Speakers

Speakers confirmed for the 2010 MassBio Annual Meeting

 

David Altshuler M.D., PhD, Deputy Director and Chief Academic Officer, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and Professor of Genetics and of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital

Kees Been, President and Chief Executive Officer, EnVivo Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Dianne Bourque, Associate, Health Law Section, Mintz Levin

Brian S. Bronk, Vice President of Chemistry, Satori Pharmaceuticals Inc. 

Timothy Coetzee, President, FastForward

Joseph F. Coughlin, Director, AgeLab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

David R. Cox, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Vice President and CSO, Applied Quantitative Genotherapeutics, Pfizer Inc.

Deborah Dunsire, M.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, Millennium: The Takeda Oncology Company

Mark A. Goldsmith, M.D., Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, Constellation Pharmaceuticals

Neal Goodwin, Ph.D., Founding Director, Jackson Laboratory (JAX) Cancer Services Laboratory

Jose-Carlos Gutierrez-Ramos, Ph.D., Senior Vice President and head of the BioTherapeutics Research Group, Pfizer, Inc.

Jeff Hanke, SVP Research and Global Head Biotherapeutics Research, Boehringer Ingelheim

Susanna High, Vice President, Business Planning and Program Management, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Ole Isacson, Professor, M.D., Ph.D., Director of Center for Neuroregeneration Research, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Anastasia Khvorova, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation

Scott Kirsner, Innovation Economy columnist, Boston Globe

Sathapana (Sam) Kongsamut, Ph.D., Unit Development Office, TSU Aging, sanofi-aventis

Arthur M. Krieg, M.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Pfizer's Research Technology Center

Raju Kucherlapati, Ph.D., Paul C. Cabot Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School

Michael Lytton, EVP, Corporate and Business Development, Biogen Idec

Howard Mayer, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, EMD Serono

Ruth McKernan, Regenerative Medicine Chief Scientific Officer, Pfizer

David Mooney, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Chemical/Biological Sciences and Engineering, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

James C. MullenPresident and Chief Executive Officer, Biogen Idec

Ulrik B. Nielsen, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Merrimack Pharmaceuticals

Andrew E. Nixon, Ph.D., Vice President, Lead Discovery & Biochemistry, Discovery Research, Dyax Corp.

Louis Plamondon, Ph.D., Sr. Vice President, Chemistry, TetraPhase Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Stuart Pollard, Ph.D., Vice President, Scientific and Business Strategy, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Brock Reeve, Executive Director, Harvard Stem Cell Institute

Richard Roberts, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, New England Biolabs, Inc.

Lee Rubin, Ph.D., Director of Translational Medicine, Harvard Stem Cell Institute

Phillip A. Sharp, Ph.D., Institute Professor, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Juswinder Singh, Ph.D., Co-Founder and Chief Scientific Officer, Avila Therapeutics, Inc

Tim Surgenor, Red Sky Partners

Henri Termeer, Chairman, President and CEO, Genzyme Corporation

Nick K. Terrett, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Ensemble Discovery

Ian Tzeng, Vice President, L.E.K. Consulting

George M. Whitesides, Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, Harvard University

Charles Wilson, Vice President, Global Head of Strategic Alliances, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Inc.

Leonard Zon, M.D., Grousbeck Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and Director, Stem Cell Program, Children's Hospital Boston

 

 


 

David Altshuler MD, PhD, Deputy Director and Chief Academic Officer, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and Professor of Genetics and of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital

David received his B.S. in 1986 from MIT, Ph.D. in 1993 from Harvard University, and M.D. in 1994 from Harvard Medical School. He completed his internship, residency and clinical fellowship training at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Endocrinologist and human geneticist David Altshuler is a founding member of the Broad Institute and serves as director of the Broad's Program in Medical and Population Genetics, as well as the Institute's first Deputy Director and Chief Academic Officer. David is one of the world's leading scientists in the study of human genetic variation and its application to disease, using tools and information from the Human Genome Project. He has been a lead investigator in The SNP Consortium, the International HapMap Project, and the 1,000 Genomes Project - public-private partnerships that have created public maps of human genome sequence variation as a foundation for disease research.

His work has contributed to the understanding of gene variants that influence the risk of common conditions, including type 2 diabetes, blood cholesterol, prostate cancer, systemic lupus erythematosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. These studies provide new clues about the mechanisms that cause these diseases, and more generally, provide a blueprint for analyzing the role of genetic variations in human health.

David is also a professor of genetics and medicine at Harvard Medical School, and in the department of molecular biology at the Center for Human Genetic Research, as well as the Diabetes Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital.

 

 

Kees Been, President and Chief Executive Officer, EnVivo Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Prior to joining EnVivo, Kees was CEO of Bionaut Pharmaceuticals, a biotechnology company using a proprietary cell-based discovery platform to advance drug candidates for cancer and inflammation. Prior to joining Bionaut, Kees spent four years at Biogen where he directed the Oncology Business Unit and, as Senior Vice President of Business Development, led all of Biogen's deal-making efforts and portfolio management activities. Major deals he oversaw include the collaborations with Elan on Antegren (now Tysabri), with ICOS on the oral LFA-1 antagonist, and with EOS Biotechnology on breast cancer target discovery. Prior to joining Biogen in 1999, Kees held executive positions with Monsanto Life Sciences Company and was mainly involved in corporate change projects and large growth strategies in Latin America. From 1988-1995, Kees worked at Gemini Consulting where his last position was Vice President, responsible for building the pharmaceuticals practice. He began his career as a scientist on the Interferon-gamma project at Biogen in Geneva, Switzerland. He holds an MBA degree from INSEAD in France and graduated from the University of Agriculture in Holland, majoring in Molecular Biology and Process Engineering

 

Dianne Bourque, Associate, Health Law Section, Mintz Levin

Dianne is an associate in the firm's Health Law Section. She advises a variety of health care clients on a broad range of issues, including licensure, regulatory, contractual, and risk management matters, and patient care. A large part of Dianne's practice involves counseling researchers and research sponsors in matters related to basic and clinical research, including patient consent, access to and use of tissue and associated patient information, and the Institutional Review Board process. She also counsels health care clients and other business entities on the requirements of the HIPAA Privacy Rule and Security Standards, including new requirements under the HITECH provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), as well as state-imposed medical privacy laws. She regularly assists clients with the implementation of HIPAA-mandated policies and procedures, privacy audits, third-party requests for information, and review of HIPAA-related contracts and forms. She has successfully defended clients in both civil and criminal HIPAA enforcement actions and assists clients with the management of data breaches and other losses of protected health information.

Before joining Mintz Levin, Dianne was an Associate Staff Attorney at the Lahey Clinic, where she provided general counsel services to medical, professional, and administrative staff. She also served as counsel to the Institutional Review Board, the Ethics Committee, the Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer Committee, and the Genetics Advisory Board. Before joining the Lahey Clinic's legal staff, she worked in the research administration department. Her responsibilities included drafting a regulatory compliance manual detailing laws of concern in basic, clinical, and animal research, continually reviewing relevant regulations to ensure compliance for institutional programs, and researching and advising clients on a broad range of regulatory matters.

Before entering law school, Dianne was a freelance writer and editor for Compliance Engineering Magazine, and served as a Special Projects Manager and a Public Information Coordinator for the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority.

Dianne received her B.A. from Boston College (1989) and a joint J.D./Master of Public Administration from Suffolk University Law School and Suffolk University Sawyer School of Management (1999). Her J.D. was awarded, cum laude, with Distinction and she was the first Suffolk University law student to graduate with a concentration in Health Care and Biomedical Law. She continues to serve as an Adjunct Professor at Stonehill College, teaching an undergraduate course entitled Health Care Law.

 

 

Brian S. Bronk, Vice President of Chemistry, Satori Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Brian is Vice President of Chemistry of Satori. Brian previously spent fifteen years at Pfizer where he held a series of positions of increasing responsibility and was most recently Senior Director of Medicinal Chemistry. During his time at Pfizer, his responsibilities focused on leading synthetic and computational medicinal chemistry and multi-disciplinary research teams to deliver clinical candidates for multiple diseases, including psychiatry, neurology, infectious diseases and metabolic disorders. By focusing on innovation and collaboration, his teams were involved in the discovery of more than a dozen development candidates, including the launched products Draxxin, Convenia, Cerina and Slentrol. Brian earned his B.A. from Colgate University in 1989. Following a year in Dortmund, Germany as a Fulbright Fellow, he initiated his doctoral work at MIT and received his Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1994.

 

 

Timothy Coetzee, PhD, President, Fast Forward, LLC

Dr. Timothy Coetzee is the President of Fast Forward, LLC, established by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to expedite commercial MS drug development.  Under Dr. Coetzee's leadership, Fast Forward will deploy $30 million in philanthropic capital through a General Fund to enable MS drug and diagnostic development programs in early stage biotechnology companies, and deployment of an additional $30 million through a Collaborative Fund, beginning with a $19 million collaborative partnership with EMD Serono to support academic and commercial MS drug development programs over the next 5 years.  Prior to assuming his current position, Dr. Coetzee led the Society's translational research initiatives on nervous system repair and protection in MS as well as the Society's programs to recruit and train physicians and scientists in MS research. 

Dr. Coetzee received his PhD in molecular biology from Albany Medical College in 1993 and has since been involved in the field of multiple sclerosis research.  He was a research fellow in the laboratory of Society grantee Dr. Brian Popko at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he received an Advanced Postdoctoral Fellowship Award from the Society.  After completing his training with Dr. Popko, Dr. Coetzee joined the faculty of the Department of Neuroscience at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, where he conducted research that applied new technologies to understand how myelin is formed in the nervous system.  He is the author of a number of research publications on the structure and function of myelin.  Dr. Coetzee joined the National MS Society's Home Office staff in the fall of 2000.

 

 

David R. Cox, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Vice President and CSO, Applied Quantitative Genotherapeutics, Pfizer Inc.

David serves as Chief Scientific Officer for the Applied Quantitative Genotherapeutics Unit of Pfizer's Biotherapeutics Research & Development. This new unit brings together human genetics, systems biology, and cell biology, combining internal capabilities with outside collaborations, to focus on increasing preclinical target validation with the aim of significantly improving clinical survival.  David is a co-founder of Perlegen, and was most recently Chief Scientific Officer of the company since its formation in 2000.

David was Professor of Genetics and Pediatrics at the Stanford University School of Medicine as well as the co-director of the Stanford Genome Center. He obtained his A.B. and M.S. degrees from Brown University in Rhode Island and his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Washington, Seattle. He completed a Pediatric Residency at the Yale-New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Connecticut and was a Fellow in both genetics and pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco. David is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Board of Medical Genetics. He was an active participant in the large scale mapping and sequencing efforts of the Human Genome Project while carrying out research involving the molecular basis of human genetic disease.

David has been a member of several commissions and boards, including the National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC) and the Health Sciences Policy Board of the Institute of Medicine. He has also served on a number of international committees, including the Council of the Human Genome Organization (HUGO). He has authored over 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications and has served on numerous editorial boards. Dr. Cox's honors include election to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

 


Deborah Dunsire, M.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, Millennium: The Takeda Oncology Company

Deborah Dunsire MD has been the President and Chief Executive Officer of Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc., since July 2005. Dr. Dunsire joined Millennium in July 2005 with nearly 20 years of experience in the commercial, operational, clinical and scientific aspects of the pharmaceutical industry. She served as Senior Vice President, Oncology Business Unit of Novartis AG from 1996 to 2000 and Head of North American Oncology Operations of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation from 2000 to July 2005.

She began her career in 1989 as a Clinical Researcher with Sandoz AG in Johannesburg, South Africa, and transferred to Basle, Switzerland in 1991, where her responsibilities included corporate marketing group. From April 1988 to August 1996, Dr. Dunsire held various positions with Sandoz.

She joined Oncology group in the United States in 1994. In 1997, she formed and headed the Oncology Business Unit of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, taking on all commercial functions, including sales, marketing, new product commercial planning, scientific field operations, medical affairs and business relations. Dr. Dunsire was also responsible for managing the merger and significant growth of the combined Sandoz Pharmaceuticals and Ciba-Geigy oncology businesses and evaluated and implemented key business development initiatives.

She has been a Director of Allergan Inc. since December 2006. She serves as a Director of California Healthcare Institute. She serves as a Director of the Biotechnology Industry Organization and the G&P Foundation for Cancer Research, a nonprofit organization. She serves as a Director of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. Prior to joining the pharmaceutical industry, Dr. Dunsire was a practicing physician. She served as a Director of Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc. since July 2005. Dr. Dunsire was the 2001 recipient of the American Cancer Society Excalibur Award and the 2000 recipient of the Health Care Business Women's Association Rising Star Award. She was also the 2009 recipient of the Health Care Business Women's Association Woman of The Year. Dr. Dunsire graduated from the medical school at the University of Witwaterswand, South Africa.

 


Mark A. Goldsmith, M.D., Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, Constellation Pharmaceuticals

Dr. Mark Goldsmith was announced as the president and CEO of Constellation in August 2009. He previously held senior executive positions in the biotechnology industry and academia. Prior to his appointment at Constellation, Dr. Goldsmith was Senior Executive-in-Residence at Prospect Venture Partners, a leading healthcare venture capital firm. Previously he served as CEO of Cogentus Pharmaceuticals and as senior vice president leading the health care division of Genencor International. Before entering the private sector Dr. Goldsmith led a medical research laboratory at the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology, practiced medicine on the faculty of the School of Medicine of the University of California, San Francisco and the San Francisco General Hospital and was consultant to leading pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.

 

Neal Goodwin, Ph.D., Founding Director, Jackson Laboratory (JAX) Cancer Services Laboratory

Neal Goodwin, PhD serves as the founding Program Director of JAX(r) Cancer Services based in Sacramento, CA that supports the global cancer drug development community. Dr. Goodwin received his PhD in Microbiology from The University of Montana and served a postdoctoral fellowship in functional genomics at The Jackson Laboratory in the laboratory of Dr. John Schimenti PhD, now at Cornell University.  He served as a Senior Scientist in the Mouse Genetics/Genomics and Biotechnology program at Pharmacia, where his responsibilities included mouse modeling of multiple therapeutic areas including cancer, high speed mutagenesis platforms, and ES cell technologies.  Dr. Goodwin most recently served as Chief Scientific Officer and Co-founder of ProNAi Therapeutics, where his responsibilities included the development of a new class of cancer therapeutics for multiple cancers, with an approved IND achieved for their first lead compound.

 

Jose-Carlos Gutierrez-Ramos, Ph.D., Senior Vice President and head of the BioTherapeutics Research Group, Pfizer, Inc.

Jose-Carlos Gutierrez-Ramos, Ph.D. is Senior Vice President and head of the BioTherapeutics Research Group, which includes three Research Units (RUs), the global Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics and Metabolism - New Biological Entities (PDM-NBE) department, and the Global BioTherapeutic Technologies (GBT) department. The RUs discover and develop novel biologics and small molecules in Inflammation and Immunology, BioCorrection (i.e., correcting pathological function in metabolic disorders and genetic deficiency diseases such as hemophilia), and Tissue Repair associated with various musculoskeletal conditions.  The PDM-NBE organization provides absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) characterization for biological entities, preclinical pharmacokinetic - pharmacodynamic modeling and quantitative biomarkers supporting the research units.  Global BioTherapeutic Technologies (GBT) supports the RUs and TUs across all of R&D to design and deliver biotherapeutic agents, and develop one of the most advanced and innovative suites of biotechnologies in the industry. Jose-Carlos is passionate about the early and iterative use of experimental medicine approaches in discovery research, the continuous focus on scientific innovation and medical differentiation during the drug discovery and the "entreprenurialization" of big pharma research groups.

Prior to joining Pfizer, JC was SVP and Head of the Immuno-inflammation Center for Drug Discovery (iiCEDD) at Glaxo Smith Kline. JC built the iiCEDD as a global group of "drug hunters" that included biologists, chemists, pharmacologists, protein scientists and clinicians who were responsible for drug discovery and development through to Phase IIa (POC). Chief achievements in the formation of the iiCEDD included entrepreneurial organizational and funding structure, the talent recruitment and identification of innovative discovery areas to focus on which were poised for medical differentiation. The iiCEDD pipeline had a very significant external component with 50% of its pipeline and activities achieved through external partnerships with biotech companies, academia and contract research organizations. 

Prior to GSK Jose-Carlos served as Site Head and CSO at AMGEN Mountain View. Previous to the AMGEN acquisition of Avidia he was the SVP of R&D, where he led a significant effort of novel protein therapeutics for autoimmune disease. Before his AVIDIA appointment, he served as CSO of Peptimmune Inc. in Cambridge, MA, where he was responsible for the development of peptide based therapeutics for autoimmune disease, including MS and diabetes. Before Peptimmune, Dr. Gutierrez served as Vice President, Inflammation at Millennium Pharmaceuticals, where he built and led a group of more than 150 scientists. Importantly, in that role he was responsible for advancing preclinical candidates in Inflammation & Immunology to human trials and advancing compounds (small molecules and antibodies)  from discovery  through clinical development.

Jose-Carlos was also part of the Faculty at the Genetics department of Harvard Medical School, where he led a major research team at the Center for Blood Research that generated more than 150 peer-reviewed publications. Before coming to the US, he was member of the prestigious Basel Institute for Immunology in Basel, Switzerland and a fellow at the Max-Plank for Immunbiologie in Freiburg, Germany. Jose Carlos received his masters in Chemistry and his Ph.D. in Immunology by the Autonoma University of Madrid, Spain.

 

 

Susanna High, Vice President, Business Planning and Program Management, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Ms. High joined Alnylam in February 2006 as Senior Director, Business Planning and Program Management. Ms. High joined Alnylam from Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., where she most recently was Director of Corporate Strategy and prior to that Director of Business Operations. From 1996 to 2001 Ms. High held a leadership role as management consultant with Accenture in their Strategy Pharmaceutical Practice. Ms. High has more than 15 years of operations, strategic and financial management experience, locally and internationally. She holds a degree in Economics and Business from Universita' Bocconi, Milan, Italy and a Masters in Business Administration from MIT.

 

Anastasia Khvorova, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation

Dr. Khvorova has contributed significantly to the RNAi field. While at Dharmacon (ThermoFisher Scientific) she made major technology advances in RNAi and microRNA.  Dr. Khvorova was also responsible for establishing and managing several drug discovery/development collaborations with major pharmaceutical companies, including Abbott and Alcon.  Her groundbreaking work has allowed her to author more than 150 abstracts, 30 patents and patent applications, several book chapters and over 40 peer reviewed publications.  Dr. Khvorova received her Ph.D. Biochemistry from Russian Academia of Sciences in Moscow in 1994 and after 10 years of working in academia and industry she joined world recognized RNAi leader Dharmacon in 2002 where she lead R&D for 6 years.

 

Scott Kirsner, Innovation Economy columnist, Boston Globe

Scott Kirsner is a journalist who writes about innovation and entrepreneurship. His "Innovation Economy" column appears Sundays in the Boston Globe, and he also writes a companion blog at boston.com/innovation. Scott has been a regular contributor to Fast Company, BusinessWeek, Variety, and Wired. Scott's writing has also appeared in the New York Times, The Hollywood Reporter, Salon, the San Jose Mercury News, and Newsweek, among other publications. Scott serves as the program chair for two regional events on innovation: the Nantucket Conference, held each May since 2000, and Convergence: The Life Sciences Leaders Forum, held in June. He is the author, most recently, of the book Fans, Friends & Followers: Building an Audience and a Creative Career in the Digital Age. His earlier books include Inventing the Movies, a technological history of Hollywood that was published in 2008. He can be reached at kirsner@pobox.com.

 

 

Arthur M. Krieg, M.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Pfizer's Research Technology Center

Arthur M. Krieg, MD is Chief Scientific Officer of Pfizer's Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Unit (OTU), which is located in Cambridge.  He was formerly CSO, Executive Vice President Research and Development, and co-founder, Coley Pharmaceutical Group, prior to its acquisition and incorporation into Pfizer in 2008.  Dr. Krieg discovered the CpG motif in 1994, and co-founded Coley Pharmaceutical Group in 1997.  He is responsible for Pfizer's RNAi, antisense, and other oligonucleotide-based programs and collaborations. 

Dr. Krieg graduated from Haverford College in 1979, received his MD from Washington University in 1983, and completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Minnesota in 1986.  He was a Staff Fellow at the NIH in the Arthritis Institute from 1986 to 1991, when he joined the University of Iowa, where he became Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology. Dr. Krieg joined Coley full-time in 2001, and joined Pfizer in 2008.  He has published more than 200 scientific papers and is co-inventor on more than 20 issued and 100 pending US patents covering CpG technology. 

 

Ruth McKernan, Regenerative Medicine Chief Scientific Officer, Pfizer

Ruth McKernan graduated from the University of London with a first in biochemistry and pharmacology. She gained her PhD at London's Institute of Psychiatry studying the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. A Fulbright Scholarship took her to the University of California in San Diego for two years and thereafter Ruth joined the pharmaceutical Industry.  In her 20 years' experience she has held many posts including Head of the Merck Neuroscience Research Centre in the UK where she led a group of 250 scientists with a portfolio from idea to POC.

Since joining Pfizer four years ago, she has been Vice President of Biology in Sandwich, Head of the Research Technology Centre in Boston and Vice President for External Research in Europe. Most recently, Ruth has been a leader in Pfizer's commitment to emerging therapeutic opportunities and is now Chief Scientific Officer of the newly-formed Regenerative Medicine Unit with research groups in the both the UK and the US.

In her spare time Ruth sits on the Scientific Advisory Board for the British Neuroscience Association, the Advisory Board of the Cambridge Stem Cell Centre, she chairs the BBSRC Industry Panel and is a visiting Professor at King's College, London. Thereafter she fits in as much gardening as can be squeezed into daylight hours.

In the scientific world, Ruth is best known for her neuroscience research on ligand-gated ion channels with over 130 publications to her name. In the real world, she is better known for her first book, "Billy's Halo," which was short-listed for the 2007 MIND awards and for her uncanny ability to always find a parking space.

 

 

 

Howard Mayer, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, EMD Serono

Dr. Howard Mayer is Chief Medical Officer for the US organization. Dr. Mayer's responsibilities include oversight of the US Medical Affairs group, US Medical Operations, US Medical Information, US Product Surveillance and Quality Assurance, and US Regulatory Affairs. Dr. Mayer joins EMD Serono most recently from Pfizer's Global Research and Development group, where he was the Global Virology Worldwide Clinical Development and Medical Affairs Disease Area Leader, focused on HIV and Hepatitis. He has worked in the pharmaceutical industry for more than twelve years and prior to his roles of increasing responsibility within the R&D group at Pfizer, he worked in the Infectious Diseases Clinical Research Group at Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute.

Dr. Mayer is a diplomat of the American Board of Internal Medicine with Subspecialty in Infectious Diseases. Before leading teams within the pharmaceutical field, Dr. Mayer was a practicing Infectious Diseases physician. He completed an Internal Medicine residency at Mount Sinai Medical Center, NY, and a clinical and research fellowship in Infectious Diseases at New England Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Mayer is well-published with more than 70 publications and abstracts authored. He received his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and his M.D. from Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

 

David Mooney, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Chemical/Biological Sciences and Engineering, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

David Mooney is the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering and the Associate Dean for Chemical/Biological Sciences and Engineering in the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. He is also a Core Faculty Member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. His laboratory is focused on the design and synthesis of microenvironments, or niches, that regulate the fate of either transplanted cell populations or cells already resident in tissues. These polymeric systems mimic the native extracellular matrix in their spatiotemporal control of information presentation to cells, and may find special utility in controlling stem cell populations. The applications of these systems include the regeneration of damaged or diseased tissues (tissue engineering), or the targeted destruction of undesirable tissue masses in the body. Dr. Mooney was previously a faculty member at the University of Michigan, and his education and training is from the University of Wisconsin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard Medical School. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of the Medical and Biological Engineering, a NIH MERIT awardee, and has received the NSF CAREER award, the Society for Biomaterials Clemson Award, and IADR Distinguished Scientist Award.  His inventions have been licensed by ten companies for development and he is active on industrial scientific advisory boards.

 


James C. Mullen,  President and Chief Executive Officer, Biogen Idec

James C. Mullen is our President and Chief Executive Officer and has served in these positions since the merger in November 2003. Mr. Mullen joined Biogen Inc. in 1989. He was named Chief Executive Officer in 2000 and Chairman in 2002. Prior to being named CEO and Chairman, he held the positions of President and Chief Operating Officer (1999-2000); Vice President, International (1996-1999); Vice President, Operations (1992-1996); and Director, Facilities and Engineering (1989-1992). Mr. Mullen is a member of the Board of Directors of PerkinElmer Inc. and the Biomedical Science Careers Program Inc. He holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an M.B.A. from Villanova University.

 

Stuart Pollard, Ph.D., Vice Presdient, Scientific and Business Strategy, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Dr. Pollard brings broad scientific and business expertise to Alnylam with almost 20 years of biotech experience. Prior to joining Alnylam, he was employed by Maxygen, Inc. where for eight years where he held positions of increasing responsibility across both scientific and business development initiatives, culminating in his most recent role as Chief Scientific Officer. Before Maxygen, Dr. Pollard worked at Biogen, Inc. (now Biogen Idec Inc.) for 10 years, during which time he held positions in both the R&D and business development organizations. Dr. Pollard earned his Ph.D. in Molecular Virology from the University of Reading in the U.K., and completed his post-doctoral work in the Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at Harvard University.

 

 

Ulrik B. Nielsen, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Merrimack Pharmaceuticals

Ulrik B. Nielsen, Ph.D. serves as Merrimack's Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer and is a co-founder of Merrimack. Prior to joining Merrimack, Dr. Nielsen was a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Peter Sorger's laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he researched the interface among biology, engineering, and computational biology. Dr. Nielsen received his Ph.D. from the University of Copenhagen in molecular biology and trained in the laboratory of Dr. James D. Marks at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Nielsen received an M.S. and a B.S. in biochemistry from the University of Copenhagen.

 


Brock Reeve, Executive Director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute

Brock Reeve, a graduate of Yale and the Harvard Business School, is Executive Director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. In partnership with the Faculty Directors, he has overall responsibility for the operations and strategy of the institute whose mission is to use stem cells, both as tools and as therapies, to understand and treat the root causes of leading degenerative diseases.

Brock comes to this role from the commercial sector with extensive experience in both management consulting and operations for technology-based companies, with a focus on life sciences. Prior to Harvard, Brock was COO and Managing Director of Life Science Insights, an IDC company, a consulting and market research firm specializing in information technology in life sciences.  Previously, Brock was an Associate Partner in the Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences practice in IBM's Business Consulting Services group, working with biotech and pharmaceutical clients on issues ranging from R&D portfolios to operations strategies.  Brock also has had hands-on operational responsibility in product management and marketing roles in software start-ups as well as additional experience in IT and the healthcare/life science market as the Healthcare Practice Director at Viant Corp. and a Principal at SRI Consulting, where his clients included some of the leading pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies.

 

 

Lee Rubin, Ph.D., Director of Translational Medicine, Harvard Stem Cell Institute

Dr. Rubin received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from The Rockefeller University and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Pharmacology from Harvard Medical School and in Neurobiology from Stanford University School of Medicine. He was then an Assistant and Associate Professor at Rockefeller University. Subsequently, he joined Athena Neurosciences (now Elan Pharmaceuticals) as head of their blood-brain barrier (BBB) and multiple sclerosis groups, ultimately initiating a project to discover an antibody that blocks lymphocyte trafficking across the BBB.  This work successfully identified an anti-integrin antibody, now known as Tysabri, which has been approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis and for Crohn's disease.  After leaving Athena, he became Professor of Anatomy and Developmental Biology at University College London and Director of the Eisai London Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Disease. In 1998, he returned to Boston as Chief Scientific Officer of Ontogeny, Inc (now Curis, Inc) a biotechnology company in Cambridge, MA, founded by Dr. Douglas Melton. Dr. Rubin's work there centered on the hedgehog (Hh) pathway and its involvement in cancer and neurodegenerative disease.  Potent small molecule Hh antagonists were identified and partnered with Genentech for clinical development. Several phase II solid tumor studies are currently underway with one of the antagonists.

In July 2006, Dr. Rubin moved to the Harvard University Stem Cell Institute as Director of Translational Medicine and is a member of the new Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology.  Much of his effort there is devoted to identifying therapeutics for orphan neural disorders such as Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Huntington's Disease and multiple sclerosis using new kinds of stem cell-based screens. He also directs a group that carries out a broad set of stem cell reprogramming and differentiation assays with numerous other members of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. Some of this work has been pulished recently in Cell, Cell Stem Cell, Nature Chemical Biology and Science.

 

 

Phillip A. Sharp, Ph.D., Institute Professor, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

A world leader of research in molecular biology and biochemistry, Dr. Phillip A. Sharp is Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Much of Dr. Sharp's scientific work has been conducted at MIT's Center for Cancer Research (now the Koch Institute), which he joined in 1974 and directed from 1985 to 1991.  He subsequently led the Department of Biology from 1991 to 1999 before assuming the directorship of the McGovern Institute from 2000-2004.  His research interests have centered on the molecular biology of gene expression relevant to cancer and the mechanisms of RNA splicing.  His landmark achievement was the discovery of RNA splicing in 1977.  This work provided one of the first indications of the startling phenomenon of “discontinuous genes” in mammalian cells.  The discovery that genes contain nonsense segments that are edited out by cells in the course of utilizing genetic information is important in understanding the genetic causes of cancer and other diseases. This discovery, which fundamentally changed scientists' understanding of the structure of genes, earned Dr. Sharp the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.  His lab has now turned its attention to understanding how RNA molecules act as switches to turn genes on and off (RNA interference).  These newly discovered processes have revolutionized cell biology and could potentially generate a new class of therapeutics.

Dr. Sharp has authored over 350 scientific papers.  He has received numerous awards and honorary degrees, and has served on many advisory boards for the government, academic institutions, scientific societies, and companies.  His awards include the Gairdner Foundation International Award, General Motors Research Foundation Alfred P. Sloan, Jr. Prize for Cancer Research, the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, the National Medal of Science and the inaugural Double Helix Medal from CSHL.  He is elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society.

A native of Kentucky, Dr. Sharp earned a B.A. degree from Union College, KY in 1966, and a PhD in chemistry from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana in 1969.  He did his postdoctoral training at the California Institute of Technology, where he studied the molecular biology of plasmids from bacteria in Professor Norman Davidson's laboratory.   Prior to joining MIT, he was Senior Scientist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

In 1978 Dr. Sharp co-founded Biogen (now Biogen Idec) and in 2002 he co-founded Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, an early-stage therapeutics company.

 

Henri Termeer, Chairman, President and CEO, Genzyme Corporation

Henri A. Termeer was appointed president of Genzyme Corporation in 1983, two years after the company's founding. He became its chief executive officer in 1985 and chairman in 1988. Under his leadership, Genzyme has grown from a modest entrepreneurial venture to one of the world's leading biotechnology companies.

Genzyme develops, manufactures and markets a range of innovative health care products and services that make a major positive impact on the lives of patients around the world. Genzyme's more than 12,000 employees serve patients in approximately 100 countries, and the company's 2009 revenues were $4.5 billion.

Mr. Termeer is recognized as a pioneer in developing and delivering treatments to patients with rare genetic diseases around the world. This work has provided the foundation for Genzyme's success, and today the company is diversified across medical areas including genetic diseases, kidney disease, orthopaedics, cancer, transplant and immune diseases, and diagnostic testing.

Widely acknowledged for his contributions to the biotechnology industry and health care field, Mr. Termeer is active in the areas of humanitarian assistance, policy issues, and innovation in providing access to health care. He serves on the board of directors of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. He is a director of Massachusetts General Hospital, a board member of Partners HealthCare and a member of the board of fellows of Harvard Medical School.

Mr. Termeer is chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston's board of directors and a board member of Abiomed Inc. In 2008, he was appointed to Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick's Council of Economic Advisors, and he is a co-chair of the Leadership Council of the Mass. Life Sciences Collaborative. Mr. Termeer is also chairman emeritus of the New England Healthcare Institute, a nonprofit, applied research health policy organization he was instrumental in founding.

With a great dedication to improving global health, Mr. Termeer is a member of the board of directors of Project HOPE, an international nonprofit health education and humanitarian assistance organization. Through a partnership with Project HOPE, Genzyme provides life-saving treatment at no cost to patients in developing countries. In addition to working with Project HOPE, Mr. Termeer has a strong interest in finding innovative ways to address neglected diseases in the developing world.

Mr. Termeer has been recognized by several highly regarded organizations for his contributions to the health care field. He received the Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology Lifetime Achievement Award from Frost and Sullivan in 2009, and was selected by Ernst & Young for its Master Entrepreneur Award in 2007 for the role he has played in guiding the overall development of the biotech industry. Mr. Termeer was elected in 2005 to Honorary Fellowship at the British Royal College of Physicians, a more than 450-year-old organization dedicated to improving health care through the promotion of high standards in medical practice. In 2003, he received the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Humanitarian Award from the March of Dimes and the Cor Vitae Award from the American Heart Association. Mr. Termeer has also been inducted as a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

A native of the Netherlands, Mr. Termeer in 1999 received the Golden Door Award from the International Institute of Boston, which recognizes the positive influence that immigrants have had on America. In 1995, Mr. Termeer was honored by the Anti-Defamation League's New England Region with the Torch of Liberty Award for his leadership in human rights and for promoting understanding among people of diverse religious, ethnic and racial backgrounds.

Mr. Termeer holds a strong regard for promoting education at all levels. In recognition of Genzyme's support for its educational initiatives, the Cambridge School Volunteers in 2006 selected Mr. Termeer as a representative of the organization's future and honored him for his leadership. Cambridge School Volunteers recruits, trains and supports volunteers who tutor and mentor students in Cambridge's public schools. In 2005, Mr. Termeer was recognized by the Action Center for Educational Services and Scholarships, which honors individuals and organizations committed to providing educational opportunities to Boston's youth. The Cardinal Cushing School for Exceptional Children named Mr. Termeer Humanitarian of the Year in 1997.

Mr. Termeer is a trustee for the Boston Museum of Science, and a director of the Biomedical Science Careers Program, which provides minority students with the support and guidance needed for successful careers in biomedical science. At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Mr. Termeer is a member of the Alfred P. Sloan Management Society. He is also a member of the board of MIT Corporation.

Mr. Termeer studied economics at the Economische Hogeschool (Erasmus University, The Netherlands) and earned an M.B.A from the Darden School at the University of Virginia.

 

Nick K. Terrett, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Ensemble Discovery

Nick joined Ensemble Discovery as the Chief Scientific Officer in May of 2006. In his role as CSO, Nick heads up our drug discovery program advancing the rapid synthesis of macrocycles using DNA-Programmed Chemistry, and exploring this structural class as drug candidates for disease relevant protein-protein and protease targets.

After working as a medicinal chemist for Glaxo, Nick joined Pfizer in Sandwich, England. He worked initially in cardiovascular disease, and is an inventor on patents for the neutral endopeptidase inhibitor candoxatrilat. Later he led the chemistry team on cGMP PDE inhibitors for angina and erectile dysfunction, and is an inventor on patents for Viagra®. Subsequently, Nick established Pfizer's combinatorial chemistry group and authored several related papers and a textbook. He also managed the high throughput screening group and materials management, and played a key role in the global integration of the Pfizer, Warner-Lambert and Pharmacia compound collections. In 2003 Nick moved to the Pfizer Research Technology Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to lead the Chemical Sciences group investigating new drug discovery targets and chemistry technologies.

Nick has a B.A. and Ph.D. in Chemistry from Cambridge University.

 

Ian Tzeng, Vice President, L.E.K. Consulting

Ian Tzeng, a Vice President in the Boston office, has nearly 12 years of consulting experience in growth strategy, regulated markets, innovation, loyalty, pricing, and mergers & acquisitions. He has directed over 80 projects with particular emphasis on healthcare, life sciences, airlines, and travel. Additionally, Ian has extensive experience with non-profit organizations in education, arts, advocacy, and public service, and he serves on boards for Inspire, Inc.; ReachingOutMBA; and the HGC Foundation. He holds an A.B., magna cum laude in Chemistry from Harvard College and is a George F. Baker Scholar, M.B.A. with high distinction from Harvard Business School.

 

George M. Whitesides, Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, Harvard University

George M. Whitesides has worked in an unusually broad range of areas, including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, organometallic chemistry, applied enzymology, molecular self-assembly, organic surface science, and nanotechnology. His current research interests include physical and organic chemistry, materials science, biophysics, complexity and simplicity, tools for biology, technology for developing economies, and the origin of life. His laboratory at Harvard University is noted for its diversity, creativity, and productivity, and for the quality of the students it produces.

He received an A.B. degree from Harvard University and a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology under John D. Roberts. He was a member of the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1963 to 1982. He joined the Department of Chemistry at Harvard in 1982 and served as department chairman from 1986 to 1989. From 1982 to 2004, Whitesides was the Mallinckrodt Professor of Chemistry at Harvard and is currently the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor.

Whitesides is active in numerous public service roles. He has served on advisory committees for the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the U.S. Department of Defense. He has also served on the National Research Council in various capacities since 1984, including roles with the Committee on Science and Technology for Counterterrorism and the Committee on Nanotechnology for the Intelligence Community. He is presently the chairman of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. Whitesides is the author of over 1,100 scientific articles and he is listed as an inventor on more than 90 patents.

He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and is a foreign associate of the Royal Society of Chemistry (UK), the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Indian Academy of Science, and the French Academy of Science. He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Among many awards and honors, he received the U.S. National Medal of Science in 1998, the Kyoto Prize in Materials Science and Engineering in 2003, the Welch Award in Chemistry in 2005, the Dan David Prize in Future Science in 2005, the American Chemical Society Priestley Medal in 2007, the Prince of Asturias Award in Science and Technology in 2008, and the Dreyfus Prize in Chemistry in 2009.

 

 

Charles Wilson, Vice President, Global Head of Strategic Alliances, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Inc.

Chuck Wilson serves as the Global Head of Strategic Alliances, leading a group responsible for research partnering at Novartis.  Partnering efforts include academic relationships to understand disease processes, biotech collaborations to access drug discovery technologies, and in-licensing of compounds prior to clinical proof-of-concept.  Prior to joining Novartis, Chuck founded and led Archemix, a company focused on aptamer therapeutics.  Responsible initially as its Chief Technology Officer for developing the company's technology platform and managing its drug discovery efforts, he moved into a business role focused on partnering with pharma and biotech companies.  Before moving into industry, Chuck was a professor in the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz where his group determined the first x-ray structures of aptamers bound to their targets.  Formally trained in structural biology and molecular biology, Chuck received his PhD from UCSF and his post-doctoral training at MGH/Harvard.

 

 

 

Leonard Zon, M.D., Grousbeck Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and Director, Stem Cell Program, Children's Hospital Boston

Dr. Leonard I. Zon is the Grousbeck Professor of Pediatric Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Investigator at Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Director of the Stem Cell Program, Children's Hospital Boston.  He received a B.S. degree in chemistry and natural sciences from Muhlenberg College and an M.D. degree from Jefferson Medical College.  He subsequently did an internal medicine residency at New England Deaconess Hospital and a fellowship in medical oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. His postdoctoral research was in the laboratory of Stuart Orkin.

Dr. Leonard Zon is internationally recognized for his pioneering work in the fields of stem cell biology and cancer genetics.  He is founder and former president of the International Society for Stem Cell Research and chair of the Executive Committee of the newly formed Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI).  He recently completed a term as President of the American Society for Clinical Investigation.  In 2005, Dr. Zon was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.   In 2008, Dr. Zon was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.

Dr. Zon's laboratory uses the zebrafish as a model system for understanding vertebrate blood development. Zebrafish blood formation is similar to that of humans, and several mutants have disorders resembling human disease.  It is possible to evaluate in the zebrafish genetic pathways important for vertebrate hematopoiesis.  Dr. Zon also uses the zebrafish to study cancer.

 

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